Click to go to Catawba County Home Page
Bookmark and ShareShare Page    print pagePrint Page
Quick Links



Translate:
cutting timber

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Randy Willis
Contact: Randy Willis
District Administrator
Phone: (828) 465-8950
Email Randy Willis

Directions

mapAgricultural Resources Center
1175 S Brady Avenue
Newton, NC 28658


Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m

I want to cut my timber, what rules do I need to know about?
The first thing you should do is contact the North Carolina Forest Service rangers located in Newton by calling 828-465-8443. The NCFS can assist you in many ways. Prior to the timber sale you can receive information including selecting a consultant, providing current timber buyer's listings, and information regarding the Forest Practices Guidelines Related to Water Quality. During the timber logging operation, foresters are available if you have questions regarding streamside management zones (SMZ). After the logging is finished, foresters can consult with you on site preparation and replanting of your new forest.

The Sedimentation Pollution Control Act of 1973 (SPCA), as amended through 1999, North Carolina General Statutes Chapter 113A Article 4; says that land disturbing activity relating to forestry operations must be in accordance with Forest Practice Guidelines Related to Water Quality. If not, there could be a water quality violation.

§ 113A-52.1. Forest Practice Guidelines.

  1. The Department shall adopt Forest Practice Guidelines Related to Water Quality (best management practices). The adoption of Forest Practices Guidelines Related to Water Quality under this section is subject to the provisions of Chapter 150B of the General Statutes.
  2. If land-disturbing activity undertaken on forestland for the production and harvesting of timber and timber products is not conducted in accordance with Forest Practice Guidelines Related to Water Quality, the provisions of this Article shall apply to such activity and any related land-disturbing activity on the tract.

To reach the NC Department of Natural Resources, land Quality Section's web site, go to
http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/lr/land-quality

The Mooresville Regional Office telephone is 704-663-1699.

How do I help Wildlife in my back yard?

There are several types of wildlife that live in the area. Every day they struggle to find food and shelter especially in highly developing areas like ours. Some examples of wildlife that can take refuge in your backyard are:

  • Birds
  • Butterflies
  • Toads, Frogs
  • Lizards
  • Turtles
There are many zones that wildlife find home in including the soil, groundcover, shrubs, flowers, and, of course, trees. You find these zones in your yard, and depending on how you enhance these zones, will decide whether your backyard supports wildlife habitats.

Varieties of plants make the best habitats for wildlife. The mixture should include:
  • Evergreen plants and trees for year-round cover and shelter
  • Fruit or nut-bearing plants and trees provide a food source
  • Hardwoods proved shelter and also leaves for ground cover and nesting materials
  • Low-lying shrubs and flowers provide cover for smaller, ground-level wildlife
  • Plant wildflowers and flowering shrubs to attract butterflies and hummingbirds
  • Basking sites made out of a few rocks that warm in the morning sun, can be a welcome invitation to butterflies, turtles, lizards, even ladybugs!!
Use Food Sources to Attract the Wildlife You Want

Few yards can supply enough food all year long. By installing feeders and setting out certain foods, you can attract different types of wildlife.
There are many types of bird feeders. Some can hold birdseed and others hold suet. Putting out foods like citrus fruit, chopped apples and bananas, and raisins will also attract certain birds.

Feeder type and placement and the type of food can help deter unwanted species.

All species whether it be birds, butterflies, or deer need a source of water. A shallow dish of water will provide water to wildlife. However, you can purchase decorative bird-baths to accomplish the same.

There are many zones that wildlife find home in including the soil, groundcover, shrubs, flowers, and, of course, trees. You find these zones in your yard, and depending on how you enhance these zones, will decide whether your backyard supports wildlife habitats.

Seeds and The Birds Who Eat Them:

Millet
Sparrows, Juncoes, Not well-liked by squirrels

Thistle
Sparrows, Juncoes, House Finches, Gold Finches, Pine Siskins, Not well-liked by squirrels

Sunflower
All Birds

Cracked Corn Kernels
Cardinals, Blue Jays

Peanuts
Chickadees

The above listed seeds can be blended to attract the birds you want. Mix them with stale breadcrumbs, crushed popcorn, or crushed crackers for filler.

You can also purchase general bird seed mixes at local garden centers and animal stores.

Suet is also a good food source, but be careful-- it may melt in the summer.

Trees: Shrubs: For Hummingbirds, Butterflies, or Bees:
American Beech
American Holly
Black Cherry
Black Gum
Crabapple
Flowering Dogwood
Hawthorns
Hickories
Oaks
Red Mulberry
Highbush Blueberry
Hollies
Serviceberry
Spicebush
Sumacs
Viburnums
Wax Myrtle
Aster
Azalea
Butterfly Weed
Coneflower
Bee Balm
Cardinal Flower
Columbine
Delphinium
Jewel Weed
Lobelia
Lupine
Penstemon
Phlox
Salvia

Back to page 1 Questions and Answers           Back to page 2 Questions and Answers